Capitalism and Slavery by Dr. Eric Williams

Brilliant find and very relevant to our conundrums, Mario; especially since the infamous age of discovery; in 1455, Romanus Pontifex authorized the Portuguese monarchy to carry on the slave trade in Africa, the Americas and beyond. In 1493, Inter Caetera, divided up these lands, allowing European Catholic monarchs to take them, displacing indigenous peoples and causing untold suffering throughout the infamous Age of Discovery;

These papal baals divided the world into Roman Catholics and heathens – the former to rule over the latter because they were declared homo animales, a lower form of man. Today, these orders are declared a monument to racial discrimination and equality; yet, still continues to drive policies worldwide.

Today, most people have been de-based in the same deceitful manner to hu[e]-man [“not quite a man”]; that is why there have been no “people rights”;

Since then have the European nations waxed rich from this piracy and slavery upon which they rapidly expanded their feudal imperial empires of capital; so much so, that today they claim to own and rule the world; while claiming to be “lending” to developing nations from what was taken from them in the first place;

To date there has been no Truth and Reconciliation Commission, no apology, no remorse, no restoral or restitution of what was unlawfully taken; and, the divisions of the past have yet to be healed.

Mario Kenny


TEXT FLY WITHIN THE BOOK ONLY gj<OU1 60509 >m Capitalism Sf Slavery Capitalism Slavery Eric Williams s THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS Chapel Hill Copyright, 1944, by THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BY THE WILLIAM BYRD PRESS, INC. RICHMOND, VIRGINIA To Professor Lowell Joseph Ragatz Whose monumental labors in this field may be amplified and developed but can never be superseded PREFACE THE PRESENT STUDY is an attempt to place in historical per- spective the relationship between early capitalism as exemplified by Great Britain, and the Negro slave trade, Negro slavery and the general colonial trade of the seventeenth and eighteenth cen- turies. Every age rewrites history, but particularly ours, which has been forced by events to re-evaluate our conceptions of history and economic and political development. The progress of the Industrial Revolution has been treated more or less ade- quately…

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